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Lowcostholidays Customer Feedback: Search & Booking

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Lowcostholidays.comCaptain Conversion ran a customer feedback study on Lowcostholidays.  The goal was to find out what works and what puts people off booking.  This post reveals some of the feedback people gave on the Lowcostholidays search and booking pages (including video clips).  And as someone who knows the value of feedback, you’ll get some good intelligence from this.

What works in search and booking

The search form was easy to complete.

Watch a video clip of what one person said:

People weren’t put off by the search form; it didn’t look overwhelming and time-consuming.  Search forms containing more fields than necessary, or more fields than visitors are used to on other sites, are likely to deter.

Filling in the search form is a necessary task, but not an interesting one.  Visitors are interested in finding flights and looking at hotels (the search results), but not the job of searching itself.  So it’s important to help them complete the form as quickly as possible: auto-completes, date selectors etc.

Lowcostholidays makes use of these time-savers, and users in this study appreciated them.

Yeah, that [looks] quite simple, quite functional.

Lowcostholidays.com

An interesting insight is 4/5 people chose to select their destination from the list, rather than type into the auto-complete field – even though typing can be quicker.  Research we’ve done in the past supports this behaviour: users prefer clicking to typing as it’s easier.

People liked the Trip Advisor ratings.

Watch a video clip of what one person said:

Everyone noticed the Trip Advisor ratings.  They felt reassured by them.  Having customer reviews from an outside source made the job of choosing a suitable hotel easier.  There’s natural scepticism for hotel descriptions written by the hotel; everything is always within easy reach.  But customer reviews tend to give people a more realistic picture.

It’s very nice that you’re providing Trip Advisor travel ratings.  It makes life much easier.

Lowcostholidays.com

Customer reviews are also social proof.  A good rating from hundreds of past customers encourages others to book: If hundreds of people had a great experience here, surely I will too.

Get all feedback from this Lowcostholidays.com study

Download the full Lowcostholidays Feedback Package (includes reports and full videos), and discover all 36 customer feedback insights and recommendations – for both the search & booking process and homepage.  Find out what works in these areas, where the barriers to booking are, and how to do better. The Feedback Package contains:

Customer Feedback Package

  • Search & Booking Feedback Report (PDF)
  • Homepage Customer Feedback Report (PDF)
  • Questionnaire results (Excel)
  • All 5 full customer feedback videos (MP4)
£449
Instant download, secure payment

Barriers to booking on search & booking pages

Someone ended up searching for the wrong number of guests.

Lowcostholidays.com

This user initially entered his whole party into one room – 2 adults, 1 child – before changing the number of rooms above.  Maybe he didn’t see the label saying ‘Room 1’, meaning everyone was in the same room.  Or maybe he’s used to entering guests first, and then choosing number of rooms.

Either way, he only noticed the number of rooms menu after he’d initially entered everyone in the same room.  So he changed it to 2 rooms and tried to put his 15 year old in a separate room (Room 2).

The problem at this stage was the drop-down for room 2 didn’t allow him to select 0 adults and 1 child.  I’m guessing that’s because under-18s can’t be in a room on their own.  But I’m assuming he wasn’t used to this rule, as he seemed confident his 15 year old could be in a separate room.

Anyway, in the end he accidentally chose 2 adults, 1 child in the first room, and 1 adult in the second – which meant he searched for 4 people instead of 3.

On top of that, he didn’t realise the mistake until much later.  This is because he didn’t notice the ‘4 passengers’ text in the summary.  It didn’t stand out enough during the booking process:

Lowcostholidays.com

It was only after he’d chosen a flight and was on the hotel selection page that he noticed ‘4 passengers’.  Here’s a video clip:

So he went back and started the search from scratch.

How do you tackle this problem then?  The first thing is to make it much more likely people choose the number of rooms before they enter how many guests will be in each room.  At the moment, the number of guests menu area is bigger (3 drop-down menus) and therefore more noticeable than the rooms drop-down above.  So people’s attention goes there first.

Try making the number of rooms drop down a bit bigger, and make the label bold.  Make room number labels bold too so they’re more noticeable.  Maybe move the number of rooms menu closer to the number of guests menus, and in line with the first room (like Expedia):

Lowcostholidays.com

Test different versions to see what works best.

Everyone missed the holiday extras section.

Watch a video clip of what one person said:

The main reason people went through to payment without choosing extras was because the content was below the fold (out of view without scrolling).  So they didn’t notice it.  One user only saw it after pressing ‘Continue’, by which point it was too late.

Lowcostholidays.com

It was especially a problem on laptop screens, where the entire extras section was hidden from view below the fold.  And because the big continue button was the element closest the bottom of the visible area, people assumed it was the next thing to do.

So it needs to be more obvious that reviewing and choosing holiday extras is to be done before pressing continue.

One way to do that is by condensing the booking summary table so that the extras section is more visible above the fold (without scrolling).  Hopefully more people would notice it then.  In addition, you could try removing the continue button from the summary table at the top and just leave the one at the bottom (below the extras section).  Maybe that way people will scroll down through the extras section to proceed.

Lowcostholidays.com

Or you could reorganise this page so that the booking summary is in a right column, including continue button.  That way, holiday extras would be seen at the top of the page, with the booking summary always visible to the right.  Hotels.com provides an example:

And, of course, you could make the booking summary always visible by having it move down the page as the user scrolls.  And update it as they choose holiday extras, like baggage and car hire.

Then they can press the continue button whenever they’re ready.

Get all feedback from this Lowcostholidays.com study

Download the full Lowcostholidays Feedback Package (includes reports and full videos), and discover all 36 customer feedback insights and recommendations – for both the search & booking process and homepage.  Find out what works in these areas, where the barriers to booking are, and how to do better. The Feedback Package contains:

Customer Feedback Package

  • Search & Booking Feedback Report (PDF)
  • Homepage Customer Feedback Report (PDF)
  • Questionnaire results (Excel)
  • All 5 full customer feedback videos (MP4)
£449
Instant download, secure payment

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